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Systemic Maturity Models and Multi-organization Collaborations

Format: Papers, RSD6, Topic: Health & Well-being, Topic: Learning & Education

Sharon Matthias and Jess McMullin

The ACMHI Mentally Healthy Campus Maturity Model

Tackling complex societal and systems challenges involves a host of interdependent factors, such as those related to improving mental health and increasing the quality and accessibility of seamless mental illness and addiction services. No one organization or government ministry can address all these factors, so success in creating significant value requires organizations to work together. Such a complex collaboration requires taking a holistic view and crafting a higher-order integrated strategy in order to maximize the contributions of multiple players. However, tackling this holistic view can be paralysing. Which factors? How do we know how we’re doing, who should do it, and what should we do next?

It seems even more overwhelming when adding the challenges of helping small, medium-size and large organizations and different sizes of communities to work together in a public sector context. This means having tools that also support different types of organizations with different policy architectures and different community contexts equally well, as well as helping them to learn their way to new ways of operating and paradigms of mental health. This challenge calls for using a design attitude, approached with a fourth-order design mindset, to create management tools that align with the complexities of such collaborations.

A systemic maturity model can be a mechanism that supports the collaboration members to understand their own progress, as well as where that fits within the whole collaboration’s progress. Unlike traditional evaluation, a systemic maturity model focuses on the systemic capability to create change rather than the impact of the change itself. Information about growth in the capacity to make a desired change is more valuable for decision-makers in large-scale societal change. Complex systems don’t allow the attribution of an outcome to a specific intervention, and growth in capacity to manage and intervene is a more explanatory tool in the early stages of an innovation, where delivery mechanisms are not yet sufficiently stable to permit assessment of impact. A systemic maturity model also helps motivate organizations to invest in continuous refinement and improving the maturity of delivery and can be a mechanism that supports the collaboration members to understand their own progress, as well as where that fits within the whole collaboration’s progress.

Keywords: leadership, policy and policy implementation innovation, flourishing communities, health and population wellness

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Citation Data

Author(s): Sharon Matthias and Jess McMullin
Year:
Title: Systemic Maturity Models and Multi-organization Collaborations
Published in: Proceedings of Relating Systems Thinking and Design
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URL: https://rsdsymposium.org/
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First published: 12 October 2017
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